Shelby Klug, right, sings and laughs with Flashback Heart Attack's Chaz Delight at the Pipeline to a Cure charity event Saturday at Huntington Beach Hyatt.

Shelby Klug, right, sings and laughs with Flashback Heart Attack's Chaz Delight at the Pipeline to a Cure charity event Saturday at Huntington Beach Hyatt. (Kevin Romero Imagery / July 23, 2014)

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  • 7th Annual Pipeline to a Cure @ the huntington Beach Hyatt with Flashback Heart Attack (featured performers) and Laird Hamilton. Photo: 7th Annual Pipeline to a Cure @ the huntington Beach Hyatt with Flashback Heart Attack (featured performers) and Laird Hamilton.
  • Topics
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Diseases and Illnesses
  • Social Distortion (music group)
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There were several highlights, and plenty of examples of heroism and altruism at the seventh annual Pipeline to a Cure charity dinner to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Most would think the ultimate highlight came with the result that $1 million was raised Saturday night at the Huntington Beach Hyatt. But to me the best part of the night was provided by a 16-year-old feisty girl named Shelby Klug.

The Orange Lutheran High incoming junior has cystic fibrosis.

You can't put a price on the attitude she displays and you can't put a price on the words she delivered for the sold-out charity event.

"Life isn't that bad," she said in a comedic tone. "I have cool hair."

That she does. She also has a cool personality.

"I am fighting cystic fibrosis," she said. "I will continue to fight because that's what I was born to do."

The Pipeline to a Cure features the surfing community. Surfing is therapy that is beneficial to those who have cystic fibrosis, a life-threatening genetic disease that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system.

Klug referred to her disease as a "genetic mutation," and called herself an X-Man, her superpower being the ability to swallow so many pills that help her breathe.

She pops up to 50 pills a day, she said, and also deals with an abnormal sleeping schedule to properly take in her breathing treatments.

She had me in tears and everyone standing to applaud her when she ended with this:

"CF can stand for many things," she said. "It can stand for cystic fibrosis. Courageous fighter. Or in my case, Chronically Fabulous. But thanks to all of you it will stand for Cure Found."

Klug later sang with the 80s cover band Flashback Heart Attack, which featured Green Day drummer Tre Cool. They sang, "Welcome to Paradise."

The same band played at the event last year when Social Distortion's Mike Ness was honored for his service with the charity. Ness' friend Billie Joe Armstrong attended the event. Ness played some Social D songs with the band.

It was hard to top that. But somehow, everyone involved did it this year.

It was truly an amazing night.

"It was a pretty magical night," said Judy Burlingham, the event chairman. "We are raising so much money. So many people are making themselves available for volunteering."

As I was interviewing Burlingham, Cameron Thieriot walked up to talk to her. He donated a vintage station wagon that went for $22,000 during the live auction.

Thieriot told Burlingham that he wants his son, actor Max Thieriot, to attend the next Pipeline to a Cure event. Max Thieriot starred in the movie, "Foreverland," in which he plays a young man with cystic fibrosis.

It seemed that everyone at the charity event somehow had a connection with cystic fibrosis.