John Murray, media relations manager, addresses members of the media at UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange on Thursday. (KEVIN CHANG / April 4, 2013)

TRABUCO CANYON — A Costa Mesa teen found Thursday after spending four nights missing in Trabuco Canyon was in good condition without any major internal injuries, a hospital spokesman said.

Kyndall Jack, 18, arrived about 12:21 p.m. hypothermic, confused and with signs of dehydration, said John Murray, UC Irvine Medical Center's spokesman. She was given fluids and underwent diagnostic procedures for internal injuries.

As of 9 p.m., Murray said she didn't have any major internal injuries but there weren't plans to discharge her Thursday night.

Jack was found about 11:50 a.m. in a steep, brushy area on the side of the canyon, according to authorities and KTLA video footage. Two workers repelled down and made contact with her as a Los Angeles Sheriff's Department helicopter hovered overhead, the bushes jumping from the winds created by the chopper's blades.

Amid the nearly vertical rocks and thick brush, little was visible other than the rescuer's white helmet and Jack's legs splayed out on the rocks. The rescuer stuck by her side and pulled her body — limp like a ragdoll — off the rocks as the two were hoisted in harnesses into the helicopter.

It took about 90 minutes for rescuers to reach her after a hiker heard her screaming, said Orange County Sheriff's Department Lt. Jason Park. Finding Jack was "a tremendous victory," he said.

It was unclear if the hiker was part of the search.

The Jack family is not talking with the media but thanked people for their help in searching and praying, Murray said.

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Not where you'd expect

Jack's hiking companion, Nicolas Cendoya, 19, was found late Wednesday evening, which energized the search crews, one official said.

Earlier reports mistakenly identified him as "Nicholas."

"This place came alive last night," said Orange County Fire Authority Division Chief Michael Boyle.

Cendoya and Jack were found about 1,400 feet apart in extremely high brush, but their exact locations were unclear, Park said. Rescuers had to cut through the brush and still couldn't see Cendoya 10 feet away.

An OCFA training team based just down the road from where Jack and Cendoya went missing were practicing hiking and cutting lines in the vegetation when someone flagged them down saying they'd found someone.

That someone turned out to be Cendoya.

He was wedged into a V-shaped ridge high off a creekbed, buffeted by thick brush. Firefighter Dave Hunt, an 18-year veteran, said the team tried several times to shimmy their way up only to slide back down.

"He was not in a place you'd expect a hiker to go," Park said.

Fellow firefighter William Holt said he had to hack his way through the brush to get to Cendoya, at some points getting on his knees to crawl through a narrow tunnel in the brush.

Once the team got to him and prepared for him to be airlifted, Cendoya seemed relieved and aware of what was going on.