Thank you, Joshua Boyle, for giving a concise and informative account of the Costa Mesa City Council meeting (Mailbag: "Council majority not communicating well," May 19).

It seems that Mayor Mansoor has a propensity for confusing the representation of his city with actual leadership and getting his name in print. The council's latest action of declaring Costa Mesa as a "rule of law" city once again shows its incompetence and embarrassing lack of meaningful direction.

You would think that with his questionable history of costing the city $522,861.88 to defend itself in the civil lawsuit by activist Benito Acosta, in addition to the $40,425.88 it cost the city to pursue the frivolous and unsuccessful criminal charges against Acosta, that Mansoor would have wanted to temper his need for controversy.

This latest unnecessary "rule of law" debacle closely follows his second attempt to push for ID checks, even though his first attempt in 2005 was a national embarrassment. With that proposal, he suggested "proactive training," whatever that means.

I can understand why Councilwoman Wendy Leece would agree. I remember her from years ago when she was on the school board and wanted to ban the book "Snow Falling on Cedars"! ("District checks into book review policy," Feb. 15, 2001)

Her proposal regarding the suspension of the state law to reduce pollution is another indication of the ignorance and absurdity that runs amok in the council chambers, with the exception of Councilwoman Katrina Foley. She seems to be the only level head on the council.

One of the problems with Mansoor is that anyone who doesn't have his mindset and expresses what he does not want to hear is rudely chastised and dismissed. This was demonstrated when he dismissed residents' comments as reckless. It seems that forthright debate is unacceptable. So much for real leadership. How about adopting a resolution for the rule of logic or knowledge? Or just listening?



Carolyn Fitz-Gibbon

Newport Beach

U.S. does not pay highest income tax

How can you let Chuck Cassity get away with blatantly false statements such as our income taxes are the highest in the world? (Sounding Off: "Higher taxes are killing the middle class," May 7)

All you need do is go on Google to find out we are way down the list. The Tax Policy Center says 47% of individuals in the U.S. pay no income tax; MSN Money even says that we "enjoy some of the lowest tax rates in the world," and their graph shows the corporate and individual rates worldwide. The value-added tax rates are also shown on these and many other sites.

I realize Cassity is entitled to his opinion, but Daily Pilot readers are entitled to your presenting factual evidence that demonstrate when the author exceeds the boundaries of truth.

Iryne Codon Black